Medicare for All
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Medicare for All
Medicare for All.
Everybody In. Nobody Out.

Invitation: Be Informed and Sign Up.

 Original Medicare Plan
(age 65 and over)

compared to
  Improved Medicare for All  

 

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Original Medicare Plan
Complicated, Partial Coverage,
Expensive, partly due to privatization
Improved Medicare for All
Non-Profit Single-Payer: Simple,
Efficient, Lower Cost, Full Coverage

LIMITED BENEFITS

Ages: 65 years and older

From the 2011 Medicare handbook:



The Medicare handbook “Medicare and You” makes the situation very clear: “Medicare doesn’t cover everything. If you need certain services that Medicare doesn’t cover, you will have to pay for them yourself unless you have other insurance to cover the costs. Even if Medicare covers a service or item, you generally have to pay deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments.”

“Some of the items and services that Medicare doesn’t cover include the following: long-term care, routine dental care, dentures, cosmetic surgery, acupuncture, hearing aids, and exams for fitting hearing aids.” Additional example(s) of what is not covered: routine eye care.

The following explanations in quotations are details about coverage and payments. See pages 120 and 121 of the 124 page handbook.

  The 2011 handbook is available at this website’s copy of the handbook (pdf) or via the Medicare website’s copy of the handbook (pdf).

Special Note about Coverage (Benefits) In addition to what is below, please see the remaining details above coverage and costs at these pages in the Medicare handbook:
— Part-A Covered Services pages 26 through 28
— Part-B Covered Services pages 29 through 44

WHAT YOU PAY IF YOU HAVE ORIGINAL MEDICARE:
   Part-A Costs for Covered Services and Items
p. 120
Blood: “If the hospital has to buy blood for you, you must either pay the hospital costs for the first 3 units of blood you get in a calendar year or have the blood donated.”

Home Health Care: - “20% of the Medicare-approved amount for durable medical equipment.”

Hospice Care: “Medicare doesn’t cover room and board when you get hospice care in your home or another facility where you live (like a nursing home).”

Hospital Stays
— “$1,132 deductible and no coinsurance for days 1–60 each benefit period”
— “$283 per day for days 61–90 each benefit period”
— “$566 per “lifetime reserve day” after day 90 each benefit period (up to 60 days over your lifetime)”
— “All costs for each day after the lifetime reserve days”
— “Inpatient mental health care in a psychiatric hospital limited to
— 190 days in a lifetime”
“See “Medical and Other Services” (below) for what you pay for doctor services while you are a hospital inpatient.”

Skilled Nursing Facility Stay
— “$141.50 per day for days 21–100 each benefit period” — “All costs for each day after day 100 in a benefit period”

WHAT YOU PAY IF YOU HAVE ORIGINAL MEDICARE:
   Part-B Costs for Covered Services and Items
p. 121

Part B Deductible
you pay the first $162 yearly for Part B-covered services or items.

Blood:
— “… you will pay a copayment for the blood processing and handling services for every unit of blood you get, and the Part B deductible applies. If the provider has to buy blood for you, you must either pay the provider costs for the first 3 units of blood you get in a calendar year or have the blood donated by you or someone else. You pay a copayment for additional units of blood you get as an outpatient (after the first 3), and the Part B deductible applies.”

Home Health Services:
— “You pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount for durable medical equipment.”

Medical and Other Services:
— “You pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount for most doctor services (including most doctor services while you are a hospital inpatient), outpatient therapy, most preventive services, and durable medical equipment.”
Footnote about outpatient therapy: “In 2011, there may be limits on physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech‑language pathology services. If so, there may be exceptions to these limits.

Mental Health Services:
— “You pay 45% of the Medicare-approved amount for most outpatient mental health care.”

Other Covered Services:
— “You pay copayment or coinsurance amounts.”

Outpatient Hospital Services:
— “You pay a coinsurance (for doctor services) or a  copayment amount for most outpatient hospital services. The copayment for a single service can't be more than the amount of the inpatient hospital deductible.”

ALL MEDICALLY NECESSARY CARE

Ages: all, pre-natal through the end-of-life

From the proposed legislative bill that will establish Improved Medicare for All: (U.S. House Resolution 676).

Items and services that Medicare-for-All will not cover include:
     cosmetic surgery that is strictly a personal choice. [If cosmetic surgery is the result of disease or an accident, it is covered.]

What is covered (examples):

     primary care;
     inpatient care;
     outpatient care
     emergency care;
     prescription drugs;
     durable medical equipment;
     hearing services**;
     long term care**;
     palliative care;
     podiatric care;
     mental health services;
     dental services;
     eye care;
     chiropractic care;
     substance abuse treatment
** see left column
See the proposed legislative bill for the entire list.



All of the above … and no major bills?; Really?!!
As also noted below, read the information at the following links to confirm that this works, based on many other countries already having the benefit of no major bills … and based on how insurance works:

Costs - No Major Bills.
Read the testimonials of Americans living and working in other countries who KNOW that there will be no major medical bills.

Lowest Risk and Excellent Economic Bonus
Read about how a large country like the United States can win instead of lose with a “large risk pool” and the ability to negotiate prices … instead of having Americans continue to finance global corporations with our money while all other countries negotiate their prices!

MANY COSTS FOR THE LIMITED BENEFITS

Medicare payroll tax

Part A (Hospital Insurance) Monthly Premium:
Most people don’t pay a Part A premium because they paid Medicare taxes while working. BUT, if you don’t get premium-free Part A, then, in 2011, you pay up to $450 each month. If you pay a late enrollment penalty, this amount is higher.

Part B (Medical Insurance) Monthly Premium: depending on your yearly income, as documented on your annual tax return, you will pay anywhere from $115.40 per month to $369.10 per month. Most people pay around $115 per month: about $1,400 per year.

Other costs related to “LIMITED BENEFITS” above

– Not all seniors can afford the costs indicated, so some seniors will have an interest amount(s) during the payment of medical bills

Examples of Other Costs that impact some seniors
– Our federal and state taxes used to pay for-profit insurers:
    – Incentives to health insurance companies
    – Tax benefits to employers who provide health insurance
    – Medicaid & many other programs in 50 states, many run by for-profit companies


THE PRIVATIZATION:
ADDED COSTS TO GET MORE THAN THE “LIMITED BENEFITS”

Part C Medicare Health … pay additional amount for this benefit, if you want it and can afford it.

Part D Prescription Drug Plan … pay additional amount for this benefit, if you want it and can afford it.

After this table are some more details about the privatization factor of Medicare, as initiated by the U.S. Congress in the year 2003.

SIMPLE WITH MINIMAL COSTS

Payment of taxes to the Medicare for All fund, which for most individuals and families is the Medicare payroll tax as the only tax contribution required.

But health insurance premiums drop to zero, so there is a significant lowering of costs for many Americans.

No so-called Medicare Advantage plan premiums, which are private health insurance company premiums
No Part A monthly premiums
No Part B monthly premiums
No Part C monthly premiums
No Part D monthly premiums


All of the above … and no major bills?; Really?!!
As also noted above in more detail, read the information at the following links to confirm that this works:

Costs - No Major Bills.
Read the testimonials of Americans living and working in other countries who KNOW that there will be no major medical bills.

Lowest Risk and Excellent Economic Bonus
Read about how a large country like the United States’ citizens can win instead of lose regarding health insurance


– Low or no co-pays, no deductibles
– Much lower drug prices via negotiations and bulk purchasing
– Much lower costs for durable medical equipment via negotiations and bulk purchasing
Dramatically lower health care costs
Higher household income due to large net reduction of costs
More U.S. jobs via higher business profits


STRESS

Financial, physical and emotional stress
of those who cannot afford the Medicare costs

Result: Hardships

PEACE OF MIND
Having the peace of mind of …
- No major medical bills
- Health care for all with dignity; show card & get care.
- Everybody In; Nobody Out.
Result: Positive experiences

Invitation: Be Informed and Sign Up.



Privatization of Medicare
The removal of privatization occurs automatically with improved Medicare for All.

Due to a law the U.S. Congress passed in 2003, Medicare is already very much privatized via “Medicare Part C” (private Medicare Advantage plans) and “Medicare Part D” (private Prescription Drug Plans).

We need to have Improved Medicare for All, returning Medicare to the simple, efficient program that it used to be … and providing it to everyone.

  • Medicare used to be simple and efficient before the U.S. Congress in 2003 started the process of privatizing it. Congress went into the wrong direction.
    • First: Medicare Advantage plans — privatization.
    • Second: Medicare Part D — privatization.
    • The Medicare website already looks like a government-maintained advertising guide to health insurance companies
  • Now Medicare has hundreds of middlemen health insurance companies included, causing unnecessary complexity and unnecessary costs.
  • We must tell the U.S. Congress in massive numbers that we want non-profit single-payer health insurance: Improved Medicare for All.
  • We want non-profit financing of health care: everybody in, nobody out.

 

Invitation:

Know What Americans Should Know

and then

Sign Up to Stand Up for Single-Payer

to help get

Improved Medicare for All. 

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