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Answers to
Your Questions and Concerns
... about
the best universal health care:
pure single-payer health care,
Improved Medicare for All

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Americans can embrace the positive about having a health care for all system. Around the world this is called universal health care. Our future of excellent physical, economic and societal results far outweighs the challenges of moving from the current system and getting used to something new.

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The Answers

 


  

What is universal health care, pure single-payer health care, Improved Medicare for All?
        
These 3 are different titles for the same thing: what we need
          in the United States, especially for the topic of how to pay for health care.
          Efficiency in how we pay for health care via our country's large size (for
          negotiating power) plus having 1 fund, 1 plan and 1 payer.
What care will we get? How much will it cost? How will it work?

         Read the following section of answers, immediatel below,
         titled "Understanding Improved Medicare for All".

To link to this set of answers from another website use:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#whtis

 

   UNDERSTANDING IMPROVED MEDICARE FOR ALL
   … universal health care, single-payer health care, health care for all



What medical care will we get?

All medically-necessary services. Examples are primary care and prevention; approved dietary and nutritional therapies; inpatient care; outpatient care; emergency care; prescription drugs; durable medical equipment; long term care; palliative care; mental health services; dental services; substance abuse treatment; chiropractic services; basic vision care and vision correction; hearing services, podiatric care.
For more information:
See: Benefits (side-by-side comparison to current health insurance);
              H.R. 676 Section 102 (benefits);
To link to this answer from another website use the following hyperlink:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#whtcare



How much will health care cost me and my family?

Because payroll income is the only income that many Americans have, those individuals and families will pay only for an increase in the Medicare payroll tax. The expected increase in the Medicare payroll tax is in the range of 3.3% to 3.7%, raising the tax to about 5%.

If the Medicare payroll tax increases from the current 1.45% to 5%, then here is the total amount of employee payroll taxes for health care:
   — $41.67/month = the health care payroll cost for every $10,000/yr of earned income
          Example: $208/month for $50,000/yr of earned income.

The fantastic savings we get in return when the U.S. has Improved Medicare for All:
   — No premiums to health insurance companies for covered services.
   — No major medical bills for covered services.
   — No co-payments (co-pays), deductibles or coinsurance.
             Examples: co-pay for doctor's office visit;
             coinsurance (a percentage of the total cost) after a hospital stay.
   — A positive contribution to lowering federal, state and local taxes due to the elimination of many of our government health programs and the reduction of governmental employee health care costs. The latter costs would include the health care costs for public school employees.
   — No more need for fund-raisers and applying to the hospital to request possible reductions in the prices on the amounts charged. There won’t be any major medical bills.

See: the long and significant list of Side Benefits: Costs and Savings,
See: Costs - Lower for Government,    Costs - No Major Bills
See: H.R. 676 Section 211 (funding),
To link to this answer from another website use the following hyperlink:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#cost



How is it possible to get more, pay less and cover every American's health care costs?
Or: How will we pay for health care efficiently?

We will drastically reduce administrative costs.
The U.S. is the only free-market country with out-of-control health care costs and without some kind of health care for all system. The one dramatic difference between the U.S. and all the other free-market countries is “overhead”. We will establish excellent benefits by cutting unnecessary administration costs: over $400 billion per year. Those cuts are possible by cutting unnecessary administration activities within the government, the health insurance companies, and the supporting bureaucracy. Other cost-cutting examples are: negotiating the lowest prices for drugs and medical equipment due to our large population; eliminating the cost of unnecessary testing and procedures due to “defensive medicine”; and cutting the amount of fraud and abuse within a simpler system that’s easier to manage.

There will be some degree of cost reduction by having a healthier population, but that's hard to quantify.

The United States will have the best health care for all system due to the addition of increased efficiency to the health care of our large population.

See: Spending among 30 Countries,
        Government Bureaucracy,
        Health Insurance Companies’ Bureaucracy,
        Supporting Bureaucracy,
        Improved Efficiency results in over $400 billion per year of cost cutting,
        Defensive Medicine,
        Fraud
        Best
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#pay

 



HOW IT WILL WORK

 



How will Improved Medicare for All work?

— Americans with an income pay into a single fund, from which one public agency (the “single-payer”) pays medical bills, including all major medical bills. In return, every American receives all medically necessary services and will have new freedoms related to health care choices and life choices.
— There will be no co-pays; no deductibles; and no major medical bills.
— Drug prices and durable medical equipment prices are negotiated to be much lower.
National single-payer health care, Improved Medicare for All, will be the best health care for all system in the world. The single-payer, the public agency will be reportable to the people. It will be publicly accountable.
— New freedoms, including freedom to choose your medical professional and new freedoms related to life choices.
See:  H.R. 676 Section 102 (list of medically necessary services)
         Explanation,   Lowest Risk,   Freedoms,
         Best,
         Benefits (a comparison to current health care), 
         H.R. 676 Section 211 (funding),   Costs - No Major Bills
… and the remaining questions in this section of the Answers
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#work



Is this going to be another government program? Who will manage it?

Improved Medicare for All is too important a function of our society to be run as a normal or typical government program. It must be set up as a separate (public insurance) agency that is isolated from the day-to-day decision-making of either national or state politicians. In fact, Improved Medicare for All will result in a dramatic reduction in the number of government programs across the federal government, the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Most existing government programs that are related to providing health care will be shut down.
See:  Explanation,    Government Bureaucracy: long list of government programs that will be replaced.
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#govtpgm



Will Improved Medicare for All address regional differences?

Yes. The regions are already defined, because the current U.S. Medicare has regions defined. The proposal, H.R. 676, makes multiple references to the need to address regional differences.
See:  Regional Offices
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#regdiff

 

For more information go to Explanation, which includes
links to side-by-side comparisons to other options.

 

Return to Topics


   CURRENT CONDITION OF U.S. HEALTH AND HEALTH CARE
   … and its impact on Americans



Is U.S. health care the best in the world?

The answer is yes and no!
Yes in terms of our medical facilities and medical professionals.

No in terms of efficiency and cost and access regarding the system in which Americans pay for health care. The current system is complex and inefficient. That complexity results in dramatically high costs, which result in Americans not going to the doctor when they should. That contributes to our very poor health outcomes and our unnecessary hardships. To improve we must move to a system that is simple and efficient so that Americans can all have access to health care.

Examples of our poor performance:
— 19th of 19 countries regarding preventable causes of death under age 75;
— 30th among 169 countries in life expectancy as per the World Health Organization (WHO);
— 50th among a review of the life expectancy of more countries (224).

The United States' health performance has been getting worse over time: the above U.S. statistics were formerly 15th of 19, 27th of 169 and 47th of 224.

See:    Complexity or Simplicity
See:    Cost per Person equals 2.5 times (250%) other countries,,
See:    Real People [19th of 19 countries],  Six Countries
See:    Performance,      Hardships,      Life Expectancy
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#usahc



Why is the USA 19th out of 19 countries in its ability to minimize deaths under age 75 due to preventable causes?

A major factor is that Americans do not get to the doctor nearly as often as people in other countries. Why? Because they cannot afford to go to the doctor. Our complexity (in how we pay for health care) contributes to our very high cost … which contributes to a very low number of visits to the doctor … which contributes to our poor performance. See the detailed charts that document this information.
See:  Amenable Mortality (preventable deaths under age 75)
See:  Physician Visits
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#prvdeth



Don't the U.S. excellent 5-year cancer survival rates indicate excellent health performance?

The prevention and early detection of a disease is a more important indicator of health performance. It is more valuable to compare amenable mortality: the number of deaths under age 75 that could have been prevented by timely and effective care.
See:    Amenable Mortality (preventable deaths under age 75)
See:    Real People
Hyper-link to this comment and reply:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#5yrsurv



How does U.S. spending on health care compare to other free-market countries?

The U.S. is the only free-market, high-income country with out-of-control spending.
See:    Spending Among 30 Countries.
The U.S. is the only country with an amazingly high cost per person with a shockingly low life expectancy.
See:    Cost per Person equals 2.5 times (250%) other countries,
See:    Cost and Life Expectancy
See:    Life Expectancy 

Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#usaspnd



What is the impact of the current way to pay for health care on Americans?

— We experience many types of painful emotional, financial and physical hardships with many real life stories to go with them.
— The average American has very poor health outcomes.
See:    Hardships,    Health Outcomes
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#impact

 

Return to topics




   IMPACT OF IMPROVED MEDICARE FOR ALL



Will U.S. health be the best in the world when we have Improved Medicare for All?

We have a good chance of becoming the best in the world. We already have excellent medical facilities and excellent medical professionals. We need to add efficiency, lower cost and better access, so that millions more Americans will be able to get the care they need and the advice and encouragement to establish good health habits.
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#besth



What support will we give to the many employees who will need to find new jobs?

They will have first priority for getting employment in the new system, receive training support and be eligible for two years of employment transition benefits, as per H.R. 676. This support applies to “clerical, administrative, and billing personnel in insurance companies, doctors offices, hospitals, nursing facilities, and other facilities whose jobs are eliminated due to reduced administration."
 See: U.S. House of Representatives Bill Number 676 Section 303 (H.R. 676).
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#emply



What will happen to the income of family physicians?

With Improved Medicare for All here will be significant contributions toward an increased net income of family physicians. Here are examples:
— no need to pay for a large billing staff or a billing service.
— no need to pay for a staff person to call a health insurance company to ask for permission to give health care.
— a dramatic reduction in malpractice premiums, since patients can only sue for mistakes, not the cost of health care for the rest of their lives.
Result: net incomes go up due to fewer expenses.
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#physinc



What will happen to the income of physicians who are specialists?

The net income, which is what matters, will decrease for some specialists, but it may increase for others.
Specialists often have especially high incomes in the U.S. compared to other countries. On the other hand, some specialists’ income may be positively impacted for the following reasons:
— no need to pay for a large billing staff or a billing service
— no need to pay for a staff person to call a health insurance company to ask for permission to give health care
— a dramatic reduction in malpractice premiums, since patients can only sue for mistakes, not the cost of health care for the rest of their lives.
There will be a positive impact of Improved Medicare for All on most or all physicians.
Result: even some specialists may find that their income goes up due to fewer expenses.
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#specinc



Will we have a problem with wait times when we have Improved Medicare for All: the amount of time it will take to get health care, such as the time to see a specialist or get treatment/surgery?

Perception regarding the future. It is very important for us to realize that our health care for all system will be based on the need for health care rather than the ability to pay for health care. If someone has a greater need, then they will naturally have a higher priority for getting care. The majority of citizens in other countries view health care in this way.
Reality regarding U.S. wait times. At the Wait Times page, mforall.org/p/Wait_Times, read examples of U.S. wait time problems and read observations about two things that patients want the most: living longer at a lower cost.
See:   Wait Times
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#waitimp



How will our health care quality be impacted?

Based on U.S. health care quality relative to other countries, we will significantly improve. Please refer to the many real life hardship stories that are available from Americans living in the U.S. and from the many real life peace of mind stories from Americans living and working abroad. When you see the multi-million dollar campaigns of the opposition regarding carefully-picked horror stories … and now you see the documented stories from your fellow Americans, who do you believe?
See:    Health Care Quality,    Hardships,    Peace of Mind,    Who to Believe?
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#qualimp



How will our health be impacted?

Based on our comparison to six top-performing countries, our relative life expectancy will improve. Our life expectancy currently is low, having dropped from 27th to 30th in the world as of June 2008. Our ability to minimize deaths due to preventable diseases is dead last at 19th of 19 countries. Our maternal mortality is poor, so our mothers do not survive a pregnancy and birth nearly as well as women in other countries. Our health will definitely improve.
See:    Performance,    Six Countries
See:    Maternal Mortality,    Money’s Worth
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#hlthimp



How will competition be impacted, including our ability to compete globally against other countries?

Competition on prices should not be part of a health care system that is focused on providing high quality health care for all. All health care professionals and health care facilities, such as hospitals, should be working together collaboratively as part of a continuous improvement process for the quality of care for all people. However, our dramatically lower prices resulting from single-payer health care, Improved Medicare for All, will positively impact our ability to compete globally for both products and services. The result will be more job opportunities for Americans within the United States.
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#compimp

 

Return to topics


   CONCERNS ABOUT IMPROVED MEDICARE FOR ALL



 

Why would I want government-run health care? I am concerned that Improved Medicare for All would be a government takeover of health care.

— Improved Medicare for All means less government, not more. We will reduce government and its spending of our taxes.
— One public agency will replace existing entitlement programs related to health care financing, such as Medicaid and SCHIP, which provide access to health care.
— The one public agency will allow everyone to have access to health care, providing a very efficient insurance "pool". Americans collectively will pay into that one insurance "pool", which will pay for health care. [In insurance terms the largest "pool" of participants means the lowest risk; we will have over 300 million participants, giving the lowest risk.]
— The public agency will be separate from the government, accountable to the people, not politicians.
— In general, people who have been on Medicare like it. We are going to extend the popular Medicare program so that everyone benefits, not just those who are 65 years old and older and/or disabled. Plus, we are going to significantly improve the program, as seen in the comparison web page …
See:    Comparison of the original Medicare to Improved Medicare for All
See:    Government Bureaucracy for what programs will be shut down.
See:    Medicare Popularity
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#govtrun

 



Is single-payer health care the same as ‘socialized medicine’?

No. Health care will be privately delivered and publicly financed. Privately-run family practice doctors will remain privately run. That’s much different than the British National Health Service or even U.S. socialized systems, such as the national Veterans Hospitals, local fire department services, public libraries, public water systems and local police and sheriff departments. Our implementation of an efficient way to pay for health care, single-payer health care, is more capitalistic than socialistic; it is the most fiscally conservative way to achieve universal health care.
See:    Socialized Medicine?
See:    Crazy Ideas political cartoon
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#socmed

 



If Improved Medicare for All is so great, why don’t we have it already?

Most Americans are not informed about Improved Medicare for All; therefore, Americans have not been communicating to the U.S. Congress about it. Informing Americans about Improved Medicare for All will increase the level of support. American citizens must inform each other. And millions of Americans must communicate in a consistent and unified manner to the U.S. Congress. That need can be addressed by the Million Letters for Health Care Campaign.
See:    Million Letters for Health Care Campaign
See:    Impact of media and impact of citizens
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#notdone



Why should I care about helping get Improved Medicare for All? I have good health insurance. My family and I are covered.

— There are millions of Americans who are hurting, physically or financially, due to our complicated, inefficient, costly way of paying for health care. Most Americans care if even one American hurts unnecessarily.
— Most Americans are also interested in having our cost-efficiency get better. Currently only 79% of our health care spending goes to health care. The remainder goes to unnecessary administrative costs. With Improved Medicare for All 95% or greater of our health care dollars will actually be spent on health care. The cost-efficiency helps ensure that our health care system gets better and better, along with all of us getting the other benefits of job opportunities and peace of mind.
— Improved Medicare for All will benefit all of us, allowing us to get more, pay less and cover everyone, as explained in “What Every American Should Know”.
See:  If Just One American Hurts,
See:  What Every American Should Know
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#allset



Will there be a large tax increase?

No. Especially considering the relatively very large decrease in the average cost per person of health insurance premiums + co-pays + deductibles + coinsurance, which go to zero, there will be a relatively small increase in taxes for the majority of employed Americans.
See:    Tax,    Costs and Savings
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#taxup



Will illegal immigrants get health care via Improved Medicare for All?

Anyone in the United States who has a valid health care card will get health care. When, if, and how illegal immigrants are provided with health care will need to be determined either during the establishment of Improved Medicare for All law or as one of the first actions after the law is in place.
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#immgr



Will visitors get health care via Improved Medicare for All?

Health care professionals in other countries sometimes provide health care for visitors either at no cost or a low cost. The details of this topic can be defined either during the development of the law or during the implementation of Improved Medicare for All.
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#visitors



Will Improved Medicare for All hurt medical research and innovation?

Medical research will continue to be alive and well. Excellent medical discoveries, innovations and inventions have been made in other free-market countries where health care is accessible by every citizen.
Examples:
— Gamma Knife for radiosurgery (Sweden, 1968)
— CT scan (computed tomography) (England, 1972)
— Laparoscopic surgery on humans (Sweden, 1910)
— Laproscopic appendectomy (Germany, 1981)
— Juvenile diabetes treatment by transplanting pancreatic cells (Canada, 1999).
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#innov



I think that Medicare costs the United States too much now, so why would we want to expand it to everyone?

Improved Medicare for All is much better than the current Medicare system.
It includes these examples:
— It will be more cost-efficient, dramatically reducing administrative costs.
— Having everyone participting establishes the lowest risk and the strongest price negotiation power, like no other free-market country can.
See:   Comparison of original Medicare to Improved Medicare for All
See:   Lowest Risk
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#medcost



Doesn’t Medicare often deny care?

— Improved Medicare for All provides more benefits than Medicare. Therefore, there will be less denial of care, because more health care will be covered.
— A denial of a claim is not the same as denying care. There will be less denial of valid claims due to more benefits being provided. There will be more denial of invalid claims, because the degree of fraud will be more tightly controlled.
See:    Comparison of original Medicare to Improved Medicare for All
See:    Fraud,    Denial of Care
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#deny



How will fraud be controlled?

A medical professional committing fraud will be identified much quicker via Improved Medicare for All.
— The simpler system will pay claims faster and, at the same time, examine all aspects of individual claims and all claims of each medical provider, such as the cost(s), the number of claims, and the appropriateness of the claim. The result will be a better and faster analysis, identifying fraud quickly and, in some cases, deny false claims immediately and not making payment.
— Patients can help. They can be notified of all claims submitted by health care providers. Patients can then report discrepancies to their provider and, if necessary, to the public agency, the single-payer. More false claims will be identified, such as claims for services that were not performed.
See:    Comparison of original Medicare to Improved Medicare for All
See:    Fraud   
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#fraud



 

Wouldn't Americans' purchase of catastrophic insurance solve many of our problems? That’s the advice I give my adult children who are single.

That is not a realistic option for most Americans. The majority of Americans do not have the money to pay for the deductible, such as an example of $5,000 (perhaps $10,000 for a family). They might not even have $1,000 to $2,000 in the bank as available cash to be able to make an initial payment for care for a sudden illness or for injuries from an accident. With Improved Medicare for All, there will be no major medical bill. We will have what is called a "low-risk pool" in the United States. We will minimize the risk of hardships for all Americans.
See:    Lowest Risk, BestCosts - No Major Bills 
Hyper-link to this comment and reply:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#buycata



Will I have the option of paying more and getting more?

There will most likely be some degree of options. For example, in some cases a certain item of medical equipment is provided; if a patient wants a better model, then the patient can pay the difference. One citizen of Canada reported his example of paying a little more for a better cane than the one that was provided; that cost was his only cost after receiving a massive amount of surgical and rehabiltative health care after a horrible car accident.
Hyper-link to this comment and reply:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#options



Isn't the United States too large to have Improved Medicare for All?

Our large size is a very positive contributor to why Improved Medicare for All will be a success. For example, we will be the best negotiator of drug prices. For decades other countries have negotiated drug prices, while we have paid high prices. In other words, we’ve been subsidizing the low drug prices of many other countries! That will now change with Improved Medicare for All. We will have not only the best low-risk pool, but large economic benefits.
See:    Lowest Risk
Hyper-link to this comment and reply:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#usalarge



Don’t we need co-pays to have people think before they get health care and help them appreciate the value of it?

Health care policy experts have researched and studied this issue. They state that co-pays are not advised. Most people in Canada have never heard of co-pays; their health care for all system is doing fine, and ours will be better.
See:    Co-Pays; Best 
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#copay



Don’t we need to address tort reform?

When Improved Medicare for All is in place, a major contribution to tort reform will automatically occur. The cost of malpractice premiums will dramatically decrease, causing physicians’ income to increase.
See:    Tort Reform
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#tort



There are many elderly Americans, so aren't U.S. high costs unavoidable?

That’s not true. Relative to other countries we have a younger population. Other free-market countries pay less than 40% times the per person amount as the United States for health care, but they have a higher percent elderly than we do.
See:    Cost per Person,    Percent Elderly
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#elder



Isn’t this a risky action for the U.S. to take?

No. Implementing Improved Medicare for all is critical for the physical and financial well-being of Americans and America. To provide health care for all in the U.S. is a low-risk, high-benefit action for the U.S. to take.
See:    Lowest Risk
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#risky

 



Do we have enough doctors and nurses to treat everyone?

— Among the health care workers who are currently working in their professions and those who are currently in other job positions, the United States has enough medical professionals to handle the transition to Improved Medicare for All. Refer to mforall.org/p/Implementation.
— Supply and Demand. The suply of health professionals will not be a problem for long. More students will become medical students for two significant reasons: 1) the need (the demand) and 2) the dramatically increased desire to go into the medical field due ro more time to heal and help human beings and dramatically less time spent on unnecessary adminstrative activities.
— Since the U.S. does have adequate numbers, this concern is not a great reason to deny treatment. Those who have the greatest need for care will certainly be treated, just like in other countries. Health care will be based on need, not on ability to pay.

See:    Implementation
Hyper-link to this comment and reply:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#nuffdoc

 

Return to topics



   CONCERNS ABOUT CANADA’S HEALTH CARE



Will this be like Canada’s health care?

No. This will be better than Canada’s. It will have 1 health insurance plan, not 13 (which cover the 9 provinces and the territories). Therefore, our way to pay for health care will be even more efficient and cost-effective than Canada’s. And drug prices can be negotiated even lower, due to the size of the U.S. compared to Canada. Also, we know from Canada's experience that we must have the single-payer set up as a public agency, where the budget and money management are separate from the day-by-day debates and decisions of the politicians. The budget must be insulated from the politicians. Canadian politicians cut the health care budget years ago; as a result, wait times increased for some years, then have been decreasing since more adequate funding resumed.
See:    Canada
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#canhc



Doesn’t Canada’s health care have serious problems?

No. Canadian health care is fine with an incredibly high 85+% approval rating by its citizens, and its health care spending is in control. Just like all other free-market high-income countries (except the United States), Canadian citizens do not have any major medical bills. As part of being a country based primarily on care with no profit motive, patients are treated in order of priority of need, not in order of how much money one can pay for health insurance or medical care. Patients with the more critical needs have a higher priority for getting health care. Most Canadians accept that their excellent health care is provided after patients with greater needs are treated first. The focus on patients with the highest need results in a better ability to minimize deaths due to preventable causes (amenable mortality) and a better life expectancy.
See:    Canada,    Canada vs. U.S. Spending,
See:    Canada saves lives better   Amenable Mortality,
See:    American living in Canada: 2.5 yrs of great care,
See:    Canada in top 10 in lifespan and USA is 50th,    Free-Market Countries,
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#canprb



Doesn’t Canada have extremely long wait times?

Not “extremely long”, but a long wait time can sometimes happen. The subject of Canadian wait times has three aspects:
1) There will always be some degree of variation across provinces, just like what happens in the United States.
2) There was a time period of unusually long wait times. The Canadian government cut back on the budget years ago, and the wait times went up for a time. Canada needed to recover from that situation. [Americans need to ensure that the public agency for Improved Medicare for All is set up to be insulated from political intrusion of its budget. Please refer to the United States’ wait time problems at the Wait Times link. Of course, we need to keep in mind that the wait times in the United States can sometimes be "forever" for the uninsured and for those who are denied care.]
3) There is a perception by some Americans that any wait time is bad. There is a “waiting and caring” attitude by many citizens in other countries.
See:    Wait Times
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#canwait



Doesn’t Canada ration health care?

Like other free-market countries (other than the United States) Canada provides health care based on need. That sometimes leads to some people waiting for care, but that is not necessarily the same as rationing health care. Their health care for all system takes care of the sickest of their citizens first. They evaluate the need and provided timely and effective health care based on that need. The results of providing health care based on the need are amazingly positive. Their amenable mortality, their deaths under age 75 that are avoidable by timely and effective health care, is better than ours. Their maternal mortality puts the U.S. to shame, and they live longer lives.
The health and health care of Canadians shines compared to Americans. The United States is the country that rations care. For example, physicians in the United States must often call the insurance company to ask for permission to provide care. Denial of care by an insurance company is certainly an example of rationing care.

See:    Rationing
See:    Amenable Mortality,    Maternal Mortality
See:    Life Expectancy
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#canrat



What about Canada’s medical horror stories that can be found on the internet?

There are now many videos on the internet of United States’ horror stories. That proves that no country is perfect, whether it’s the United States or Canada or any other country. Since the United States is significantly larger than Canada, we can logically find and document many more medical horror stories in the U.S. than Canada. What matters is what happens to the average person, such as the average Canadian … or the population-adjusted average of six countries compared to the United States. That is an example of data that is meaningful information for consideration.
See:    Canada,    Six Countries
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#canhorr



Aren’t patients flocking from Canada to the U.S. in large numbers to get good health care?

No. If that was true, you would be hearing MUCH more about it in the U.S. news media. It would occasionally be on the front page of all newspapers. There are Americans who married Canadians and are now unable to live in the United States because they can get life-saving care in Canada that is unaffordable in the United States. Also, there are a shockingly high number of Americans fleeing the U.S. to other countries for excellent care at a decent price (medical tourism). If the U.S. media was reporting the truth about Canada’s health care, they would occasionally report the incredibly high (86% and higher) approval rating by Canadian citizens about their health care!
See:    Americans who can’t come home,
See:    Medical Tourism,    Canada
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#can2usa

 

Return to topics



   THE PATH TO GETTING IMPROVED MEDICARE FOR ALL



Don't we have too many people unemployed to try to implement Improved Medicare for All? We won’t be able to pay for a health care for all system.

  • Help for the economy is one of the biggest reasons that we need to implement Improved Medicare for All as soon as we can. We can help the economy by over $400 billion per year. Over the next ten years that’s a projected $4 trillion contribution to U.S. global competitiveness and the resulting positive impact on U.S. jobs.
  • Incredibly, instead of contributing to the U.S. economy and jobs by starting up Improved Medicare for All … and cutting health care costs with a health care for all system … we are starting up a health-care-NOT-for-all system that increases our costs by over $300 billion over ten years and leaves out over 20 million Americans at the end of the implementation. That new version of a health-care-NOT-for-All system is the Affordable Care Act of 2010, often called Obama's health care law or Obamacare.

We need to have Improved Medicare for All which CUTS $4 trillion instead of INCREASING health care costs by $300 billion over the next ten years. We need to finally pool our money together into one single-payer “risk pool”, lowering our risk of hardships and maximizing our economic benefits. We need efficiency. By lowering labor costs via lower health care costs we can recover businesses and jobs that had been lost, including jobs lost to medical tourism, and have improved job security for existing jobs.

See:    Lowest Risk plus Excellent Economic Bonus 
See:    Improved Efficiency of $400 billion per year
See:    March 2010 Law (the Affordable Care Act of 2010)
See:    Financial Impact of the Affordable Care Act of 2010, including
           $300 billion over 10 years plus common sense observations
See:    Answer about Medical Tourism
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#toughtm



Aren’t there a lot of “brick walls” in the way of getting Improved Medicare for All?

Brick walls? We cannot worry and focus on the negative. We need to get to the “doing” and get it done. We think positively. We are focused and committed, not significantly impacted by “brick walls”. We can and will get Improved Medicare for All. Health Care Patriots can help get it in a positive manner by informing Americans of the excellent benefits of Improved Medicare for All.
See:    Benefits,    Mission,    Vision,    Strategy,    Plan,    Goal
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#walls



Don’t we need to also take the action of getting rid of corporate influence on the actions of members of the U.S. Congress?

Backgroud: the corporate influence of money. People in public office are concerned about what their constituents want, but they are also very concerned about how much money they get from corporate sponsors for their next campaign. That money is used to influence voting, essentially helping to control our opinion in favor of voting for them.

We will increase the influence of votes from constituents. We are establishing knowledge of the benefits of Improved Medicare for All so that Americans will want it. Our unity of coordinated campaign communications from Americans to Washington D.C. will replace politicians' concerns about money from sponsors. Instead, they will have concerns about how solidly they can support Improved Medicare for All in order to get votes from voters.

The power of citizens' education and communications will be greater than that of the lobbyists, because those persons in public office would like to keep their jobs.

Knowledge and unity and our communications will triumph.

See:    Million Letters for Health Care Campaign
See:    Impact of media and impact of citizens
See:    Strategic Actions
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#corpinfl



What are the odds that we will get the attention of the U.S. Senators and U.S. Representatives in the U.S. Congress so that they will respond to us?

The odds are excellent due to our people power that results from our campaign's focus on education and communications, which together establishes our knowledge and numbers.
See:    Million Letters for Health Care Campaign
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#odds

 

Return to topics

HOW WE WILL GET IT



How can we help get Improved Medicare for All?

— Become informed by knowing "What Americans Should Know"
         and then sign up for the campaign.
— Inform others.
— Donate to keep the Million Letters for Health Care Campaign running.
— Shop for promotional products to help promote Medicare for All.
— Volunteer to help.


See:  What Americans Should Know     Sign Up
See:  Donate to help keep this campaign running
See:  Shop for Medicare for All Promotional Products
To volunteer contact Bob.
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#help



Is there any proposed legislation in the U.S. Congress for Improved Medicare for All?

Yes. House of Representatives Bill Number 676.
FYI:  The bills S.916 and H.R.1200 propose 50-56 health care plans, not one efficient plan for the entire country.
See:    HR676
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#res



Is there a U.S. Senate bill equivalent to H.R. 676?

No. Some people imply or indicate that S.703 is an equivalent, but it isn’t.
S.703 (now S.915) is equivalent to H.R. 1200.
See:    S.703 (which is now S.915 in the 112th Congress) ... compared to H.R. 676)
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#senate

 

Return to topics




Shouldn’t we consider what other countries have done with respect to their health care for all systems?

Yes. Definitely. However ...
— Many health care policy experts plus ordinary citizens have already studied other countries' systems.
— We have testimonials of first-hand knowledge and experiences of how it is to live and work in other countries that have varying kinds of universal health care systems.
— It's important to keep in mind that the size of our country gives us .  dramatic differences

because other free-market countries provide health care access to all at a much lower cost per person and have a very high degree of patient satisfaction.
— The biggest difference has already been identified and studied: the differences in degree of efficiency. The United States has a complex, inefficient way to pay for health care with not one, but three, types of bureaucracy. Unnecessary administrative functions within those bureaucracies are the primary cause of the inefficiency.

— Other countries control their costs; the U.S. does not due to the unnecessary administrative costs within three types of bureaucracy. As noted in the answer above, the degree of efficiency is the biggest factor. Due to our country's size, a change from "a very complex way of paying for health care for some" to "a very simple way of paying for health care for all" will make our country's health care for all system the best in the world.
      See:    Spending Among 30 Countries
      See:    Bureaucracy
      See:    Best

Additional information:

— Canadians love their national health insurance as per very high percentage results on multiple polls (86% and higher) and their health care costs are dramatically lower.
      See:    Canada,    Canada vs. U.S. Spending
— Citizens in other countries live longer lives, but pay much less for health care.
      See:    Cost and Life Expectancy
— Americans living and working in other countries generally like living in a country that has health care for all.
      See:    Testimonials from more than 10 countries
— There is much information available on other countries’ systems:
      See:    Systems of Other Countries
— “The Healing of America” by T.R. Reid, published in 2009, includes chapters on France, Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, and Canada.
Hyper-link to this question and answer with an idea for wording:
Extensive coverage of the topic of studying other countries is found here:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#othr1



Don't we need money for media to have our efforts be successful? ... such as tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars just to develop, produce and broadcast media campaigns to educate the public.

.

.

x

Money is needed to run the campaign operations, especially the high cost of sending millions of campaign e-mails.

However, we will not need the tens or hundreds of millions that the opposition has often spent within just one year.

Our millions of dollars spent will primarily be spent by individual participants, doing the following:
— Buying stamps and envelopes, using telephones and computers.
    Those purchases and spending are valuable contributions that will have a major impact involving millions of Americans.
— Considering and making other valuable contributions: one-time or monthly donations to enable the campaign to continue its operations.

We will do education by word-of-mouth: direct one-on-one contacts among Americans in a massive spreading of the knowledge. Except for the spending of money for (optional) printing of documents and the (optional) purchase of promotional materials, the spreading of knowledge occurs at minimal cost using existing computers. The computers can be at homes or other locations, such as libraries and supportive organizations.

See:  Donate, and Shop
See:  Low-Cost Printing 
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#money

 



 

   ALTERNATIVES (also see LEGISLATIVE ACTIVITIES)



Let’s lower the eligibility age for Medicare to 55.

“Lowering the eligibility age for Medicare to 55 only works if it is mandatory. Otherwise it becomes the place where all the sickest patients get dumped. That might be okay for the sick people since Medicare is often better and more secure than private coverage, but it would drive total health care costs (and premiums) up, not down.”
— See PNHP FAQs
Hyper-link to this comment and reply:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#agelwr



Let’s implement single-payer in individual states.

The topic of state-level efforts is out of the scope of this website and our Million Letters for Health Care campaign. We focus on supporting the Health Care Patriots coalition.
Hyper-link to this comment and reply:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#bystate

 

 


 

  

   FREE-MARKET   including health insurance companies's topics

 



We had all free-market health care years ago, such as in the late 1700's and 1800's. Why don’t we go back to it now?

Health care is much different now. Technology and medical advancements have driven costs up to the point that only the very rich or those able to pay for the best insurance can withstand the financial burden of a major medical event. In fact, considering the cost of some frequently used medical devices, many Americans cannot afford the cost of a specific test to determine their medical condition. Even 50 years ago we didn't have the high tech medical equipment and diagnostic tools of today that are so extremely expensive. Comparatively speaking, medical care was very rudimentary in the past. Expensive treatments were not available. We've come a long way. Compared to pioneering days that involved paying for health care in a local and individual manner, we now have both the opportunity and the need to pay for health care in a national and group manner. The lowest "insurance risk pool" has the highest number of people in the "pool". The result is that every American can benefit from the technology and medical advancements for the benefit of individuals, families, and our society as a whole. In addition, we tried to expand the free-market solution(s), starting in the 1970's. The end result has been failure, since the United States, starting in the 1970's, has been the only free-market country with out-of-control health care costs. That's a failure that has caused hardships for Americans and America, both physically and financially. There is a more extensive answer at the link to "Free-Market Health Care".

See:    Free-Market Health Care
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#freemkt1

 



Can't we give the for-profit health insurance companies a chance to solve the problems?

Increased use of for-profit health insurance companies has been in use for the last 30 years, first with the establishment of the concepts of “managed care” and “health maintenance organizations” in the 1970’s and later by the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003. During that same time health care costs in the U.S. dramatically climbed out-of-control compared to all other free-market high-income countries. The fundamental high-cost nature of for-profit health insurance companies involves activities that help keep them in business, such as the need to advertise, and activities that maximize their profits. That situation results in their inability to dramatically reduce costs, especially when compared to the fundamental low-cost nature of single-payer health care.
See:    Graph of Spending Among 30 Free-Market Countries, showing U.S. uniquely out-of-control costs
See:    Fraud
Hyper-link to this comment and reply:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#freemkt2



Why did the health insurance companies and a for-profit version of Medicare fail so badly between the mid-1970’s and now?

The use of for-profit health insurance companies is extremely costly for our nation. Their administrative costs are a conservative 15-17% ... and a total administrative cost impact of 25-30% on our society which must currently do business with them ... instead of the 3-5% that are realized with single-payer health care. The 25-30% includes not just the inefficiency of the health insurance companies themselves, but also the impact that they have overall, such as the need to have large registration and accounting staffs at medical offices and medical facilities, such as hospitals. But what is not included in the 25-30% is the devastating impact on our economy, such as businesses and jobs lost to other countries because we have been so cost-inefficient. Companies want to minimize their costs, such as minimize labor costs, which are higher when there are higher health care costs.
In the United States:
— costs are out of control;
— costs will stay out of control with the new law (Affordable Care Act) of March 2010;
— costs will dramatically drop when we implement Improved Medicare for All.
See:    Improved Efficiency with improved Medicare for All,
See:    Cost per Person,    Spending among 30 countries
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#freemkt3



Don't health insurance companies cost us 30 to 40 percent of the money that is spent on health care?

That high of a number should always be accompanied by some clarification, especially since some people say that it's only 15-17%.  The administrative costs directly within the health insurance company operations are 15-17% . But that is NOT their total impact. Their overall impact is at least 25-30%, which amounts to an incredible amount of money: over $400 billion per year, a completely unnecessary burden on Americans and America. Why is their total impact so very high? The 25-30% minimum impact includes not just the inefficiency of the health insurance companies themselves (15-17%), but also the impact that they have overall, such as the need to have large registration and accounting staffs at medical offices and medical facilities, such as hospitals. But one could argue that the total impact is actually higher, such as the 30-40%. What is also not included in the 25-30% is the devastating impact on our economy, such as businesses and jobs lost to other countries because we have such horrible inefficiency when it comes to health care costs. Companies want to minimize their costs, such as minimize labor costs, which are higher when there are higher health care costs. In the United States: 1) costs are out of control; 2) costs will stay out of control with the new law (Affordable Care Act) of March 2010; 3) costs will dramatically drop when we implement Improved Medicare for All. Please note that there are actually three health care related bureacracies within the United States for which all three need an elimination of unnecessary administrative costs. Select the "Bureaucracy" link to learn more.

See:   BureaucracyImproved Efficiency with Improved Medicare for All,
See:   Cost per Person,    Spending among 30 countries
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#freemkt4

 

 



   OTHER FACTORS



Shouldn’t we demand health care as a human right as part of the effort to get Improved Medicare for All?

Some Americans feel very strongly about the need to emphasize that health care is a human right. That aspect of getting health care for all is recognized, but not strongly emphasized, at this website and our campaign. Whether health care is considered by someone to be a “human right” or not, health care is certainly a "public good": an activity for the "greater good” of all within a society. We suggest that the strongest emphasis be on helping Americans prepare for this significant change to our society. That requires helping Americans become informed, including learning the details of the positive impact of a health care for all system and then communicating to Washington, D.C., in a massive, united way.
Our power as citizens will come in our positive expectations about our future. Our power will come in working to make sure that Americans are PREPARED mentally for the change and EMBRACE it instead of fearing it.
Members of the U.S. Congress need to respond when millions of informed Americans have signed up at this website to communicate to Congress. If they do not respond, then our massive number of informed Americans will establish our best position to demand our rights.
See:    If Just One American Hurts … and Tens of Millions of Americans are Hurting
See:    Human Right,    United Nations,    Power of the People
See:    the way to become informed and to sign up for the campaign
Hyper-link to this question and reply:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#hright



Are the salaries of health insurance company CEO's a significant part of the problem regarding the cost of U.S. health care?

CEO salaries are a relatively small part of the overall problem. Complaints about health insurance companies are known to cause a very deep fear and grave concern in the minds of many Americans about the future loss of those jobs. Americans do not want other Americans to lose their jobs.
See:    What will happen to employees of health insurance companies?
See:    Health Insurance Companies
Hyper-link to this question and reply:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#ceosal



Won't the number of abortions increase significantly with Improved Medicare for All?

Based on the number of abortions per 1000 women in other free-market countries with health care for all systems the number of abortions will decrease significantly in the United States when we implement Improved Medicare for All. One obvious reason is that health care is available for the pregnant woman and then for the mother and newborn.
See:    Abortions
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#abort1



What will be done about the issue of abortion rights, a woman’s right to choose?

Answer Part 1. Based on the experience of other countries, abortion rates are most likely going to decrease when the United States implements a health care for all system via Improved Medicare for All.

Answer Part 2. Whether one calls it “saving the life of the unborn” or “a woman’s right to choose”, the issue of abortion rights was demonstrated to be a separate topic during the development of the March 2010 law (Affordable Care Act of 2010). It is a separate topic from obtaining a health care for all system in the United States. Especially since a health care for all system has been demonstrated to have the positive impact of a lower number of abortions, the separation must continue, so that Americans can get Improved Medicare for All as soon as possible.

See:    Abortions
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#abort2



Why don’t we have people simply take care of themselves?

Answer Part 1. As long as an individual/family is healthy and has no major medical event, they probably can. However, only the very rich can withstand the economic effects of a major event. Even if a person/family has done all the right things and has healthcare insurance, they are not always as protected as they may think. There are many, many stories of families that have had to fight their insurance company as hard as they had to fight their medical challenges in order to get the insurance to pay. Some have had their carrier drop them from coverage. 

Answer Part 2. It’s not that easy. Accidents happen. Diseases spread. But we do need to have Americans take care of themselves and be informed patients (including asking questions). These actions of Americans are needed no matter what kind of health care system we have.

See:    Take Care of Yourself,    Ask Health Care Questions
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#takecare



Can’t patients help control costs?

Yes! In parallel with getting and keeping Improved Medicare for All … and taking care of ourselves … we need to take responsibility for educating ourselves, including asking questions of our family physician and other medical professionals ... and doing the following actions:
— taking care of ourselves in order to feel better, avoid disease, and hold down the cost of health care
— reporting obvious fraud AFTER we have communicated a concern to the person suspected of committing fraud. Communications are very important. The concern might be simply a case of the patient needing some education or a case of misunderstanding of some kind between the medical professional and the patient.
See:    Take Care of Yourself,        Fraud,
See:    Guide to Controlling Fraud,   Ask Health Care Questions
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#control



Aren't we talking about health care, not health insurance?

Both terms are used, and both of them are applicable. “Single-payer health care” is used more often than “single-payer health insurance”. “Single-payer health care” means a health care for all system where the health care is paid primarily via a “single-payer”, a public agency. However, there is nothing wrong with calling that “single-payer health insurance”. The concept of insurance is that people “pool together” money to cover a risk, such as the risks of a house-fire, a car-accident or a medical-need. We will have a low-risk pool, the best low-risk pool for health care in the world due to our large population.
See:    Lowest Risk
Hyper-link to this comment and reply:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#hins



What is medical tourism, and what is its impact?

Each year hundreds of thousands of American patients go to other countries for decent care at a much better price, experiencing another culture and, if possible, seeing the sites. Impact: a huge negative impact (on millions of U.S. health care jobs) related to the treatment of 750,000 patients (2007), which grew to an estimated 1.5 million (2008).
See:   Medical Tourism.
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#medtour

 



What will be the impact of the current law: the Affordable Care Act of 2010?

The law maintained the complexity and inefficiency that we had in how health care is financed. The Congress and the President, via the new law, added more complexity. More regulations on health insurance companies will result in higher health care costs. The additional complexity will result in higher government costs, causing higher taxes. The 2010 law will help some Americans, but is projected to leave tens of millions with no health insurance.
See:    March 2010 Law (PPACA, the Affordable Care Act of 2010), Obamacare,
See:    Financial Impact of the Affordable Care Act of 2010
See:    Health Care Reform side-by-side comparison of ACA of 2010
                    compared to national single-payer, Improved Medicare for All
See:    Opposition to mandated insurance and Affordable Care Act in Massachusetts,
See:    Massachusetts Mandatory Plan: the impact in Massachusetts:
           and the ballot-box documented opinion of the people of Massachusetts
See:    Increased Regulations on health insurance companies: the impact in New York state
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#aca2010
Note:  Go here for a more extensive answer to this same question with same set of links.


 

   MILLION LETTERS FOR HEALTH CARE CAMPAIGN



What feedback do you get from Americans about the campaign?

Many of the Americans who sign up have taken the time to communicate a comment of strong support.
See: What Participants Say
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#feedbk



Isn't there a problem getting U.S. Mail to Congress?

No, there is no problem. It takes 5-7 days for a letter to arrive at the offices of the U.S. Congress. Go to the following link to know the details about the associated rumor and the facts about U.S. Mail going to the U.S. Congress.
See: About Sending Mail via USPS to Congress: rumor and fact
Hyper-link to this comment and reply:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#sendenv



Why do we have to print the letter on PAPER and send it in the U.S. Mail!? Email is faster and easier; you’ll get a better response rate.

Americans don’t send many letters in the U.S. Mail to their members of the U.S. Congress. That makes this campaign special. As reported in 2005 in a “Communicating with Congress” study, individualized (personalized) postal letters have a higher impact than e-mails. Therefore, when a U.S. Representative knows that thousands of their constituents are taking the time to print and personalize and send a letter in the U.S. Mail, that U.S. Representative will most likely respond positively to the input.
See:    Sending via Paper: why it's practical and powerful
See:    What Participants Say
See:    About Sending Mail via the U.S. Mail to Congress: rumor and fact
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#sendppr



What communications occur beyond sending letters in the U.S. Mail to the U.S. Representatives?

The In Phase 2 of the campaign there will be suppprovides support for:
— The sending of 1 monthly reminder to:
          Send 1 letter to 1 person, your U.S. Representative
          and optionally send letters to your two U.S. Senators.
— Additional actions, such as very efficient phone calls, that we will do
        occasionally when our strength in numbers is in the millions.

“Extras” … extra actions to consider taking, fully supported with instructions intended to help minimize the time and effort for each additional action:
Send a copy of your monthly letter in the U.S. Mail to your U.S. Senators, also noted above.
Send a copy of your monthly letter in the U.S. Mail to President Obama; instructions are provided for how to do that with the least amount o— Make Calls. Make a short toll-free call(s) not only to your U.S. Representative, but also to the list of current targeted persons, which are either mainly or only members of the U.S. Congress.
Send FREE fax. Send a free fax to the White House Office of Health Reform. Please note that this is truly free to the single-payer movement: that is, the movement that will get us Improved Medicare for All and then keep it.

AFTER you sign up you will receive the link in each monthly reminder that takes you to instructions for all the above actions.
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#domore1

 

Why is the primary focus on the U.S. Representatives?

First Phase. Representatives get letters. 1. The initial need is for millions of us to become informed and do a little each month: 10-15 minutes per month to send the 1 letter in the U.S. Mail to 1 person. 2. The monthly action by each of us can be focused only on one person until our numbers get into the millions. That is, what will get us the best results is a) to have as many Americans as possible participate, b) to have the habit of doing a small monthly action and c) to have each of us educating each other and getting more and participants.
Later Phases of the Campaign.  Beyond the continued activity of educating each other, we can and will occasionally send more letters to more people in Washington, D.C. and occasionally make phone calls when our numbers are in the millions. That will be triggered by the instructions in specific monthly reminders. On those months it will take 20-30 minutes or so of effort instead of 10-15 minutes.
During all phases. Any participant in the campaign can do more actions each month if desired. Instructions are provided for how to do the "extras" (extra actions).
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#domore2



How does anyone know that the letters are actually being sent in the U.S. Mail to the U.S. Representatives?

We verify that letters are being sent in these ways:
1) by the overall results:
               the number of supporters of Improved Medicare for All in the U.S. Congress.
2) by the specific results:
               from individual U.S. Representatives, such as their press releases
               and from the news media reporting
3) by inputs from individual Health Care Patriots: over 20 million Americans
               with their eyes and ears open about this topic. Some patriots
               already make regular contacts with Congress' staff members
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#sendknw

 


   MEDICARE FOR ALL WEBSITE



Why don’t you provide the latest news … or news and analysis … for participants?

That would be a waste of our time,
because it would be a duplication of effort.
See:    Daily Updates and Blogs
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#news



Why don’t you include the important topic of patient safety?

We agree that patient safety is an important topic. We plan to include it in the future, especially with the planned Good Health for All website, which currently automatically links to the Medicare for All website. In the meantime, an important topic related to safety is communications with health care professionals.
See:    Ask Health Care Questions
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#safety



What is "we"?

This website has been developed via the efforts and input of many people over time, starting with the initial period of 2007 through 2012. When the word "we" is used, that generally means Bob plus one or more other Health Care Patriot volunteers, who reside across the United States plus Americans who live and work in other countries. The development of this website was the combined effort of many people, as is the website's continued maintenance and refinement.
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#whynotlistteams

 



   LEGISLATIVE ACTIVITIES



What will be the impact of the Affordable Care Act of 2010? (PPACA/HCERA: Obamacare)?

The new law will:

1) help millions of Americans directly via specific benefits defined by the law,
2) hurt millions of Americans directly and indirectly. U.S. health care costs will be higher than if no new law had been implemented. And we will pay higher taxes to pay for the subsidies and the expansion of government. The subsidies will be direct payments to health insurance companies!
3) hurt the country economically, since the higher health care costs means that we will not be as globally competitive. That means more lost jobs, which hurts American individuals and families.

Complexity. — The law increases the complexity of how Americans pay for health care. That complexity results in increased inefficiency, increased bureaucracy and higher costs. The higher costs will be experienced not just by individuals and families, but also by all levels of government due to the increased costs of benefits that are provided to government employees.
Sky-Rocketing Premiums. — The state of New York had already demonstrated … and still is demonstrating … that the addition of regulations on health insurance companies causes rates to be incredibly high. In New York the premiums for a family have been approaching the entire median family income for a year in the United States. See the linked web page for the details.
Bad Foundation. — The new law was accurately described as a U.S. version of the Massachusetts law. The Massachusetts law has been a failure; some residents there call it a Gestapo-like state, and costs have been sky-rocketing. The federal government (via us, the taxpayers) had to give Massachusetts more money than expected in order for their health reform to keep operating.
Raising of Costs Instead of Cutting Costs. — Over 10 years we will pay $300 billion more while implementing a health care NOT for all system with an esimated 20 to 40 million Americans still uninsured (from two separate estimates). When the U.S. Congress establishes Improved Medicare for All, a health care for all system, we will have a reduction of bureaucracy, including less government, and a decrease in costs of over $400 billion per year over the comparable 10 year period.
See:    March 2010 Law (PPACA, the Affordable Care Act of 2010), Obamacare,
           Financial Impact of the Affordable Care Act of 2010
           Health Care Reform side-by-side comparison of ACA of 2010
                       compared to single-payer, Improved Medicare for All
           Opposition to mandated insurance and Affordable Care Act in Massachusetts,
           Massachusetts Mandatory Plan: the impact in Massachusetts:  Massachusetts
           Increased Regulations on health insurance companies: the impact in New York state
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#mar10imp



Who were the 34 Democrats who joined all of the Republicans in the U.S. House voting against the Affordable Care Act in March 2010?

One or more U.S. Representatives from each of the following states voted “no” on the health care reform votes of March 21, 2010: AL(2), AR(2), GA(2), ID, IL, KY, LA, MA, MD, MN, MO, MS(2), NC(3), NJ, NM, NY(2), OH, OK, PA(2), SD, TN(2), TX, UT, VA(2).
See: Votes March 2010
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#34dems10



Is Representative Alan Grayson's proposal an option? He introduced a bill in the U.S. House that seems to be a true public option: House of Representatives Bill Number 4789 (H.R. 4789).

Effort spent on any public option is effort spent on a woefully inadequate solution. We need to have Americans being unified, having efforts spent all on the best solution: Improved Medicare for All.
See:    H.R. 4789
Hyper-link to this comment and reply:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#hr4789




   MEDICARE



How do I enroll into Medicare?

Be prepared to give specific information when you call the toll-free number after your 65th birthday. The phone number, the required information, and a clarification about Medicare vs. Medicaid are provided at the following link.
See: Medicare Enrollment
Hyper-link to this question and answer:
http://www.mforall.org/p/830#enroll


LINKING … “Hyper-link to this question and answer:”

About linking to one of these answers. At each answer at or near the bottom you will see “Hyper-link to this question and answer”. Here is the purpose for that information:

When you are communicating in an e-mail or at another website, such as at a newspaper website or blog, you may want to link to an answer at this web page. Hyper-link information is provided as the last line of each answer, so that you can copy it and paste it into your communication. Note: not all blog/comment functions at websites convert the hyper-link definition into a hyper-link. Therefore, after you insert a hyper-link into your comment, you may want to double-check to see if it was converted into a link or not.

LEARNING and SHARING

By reading this Answers web page you learned or will learn important information about national single-payer health care, Improved Medicare for All and related topics. Getting Improved Medicare for All established is critical for the physical and financial well-being of Americans and America.

You’ll learn even more by reading the associated linked web pages: notice the “See” at many of the answers.

Sharing is another way to learn. Sitting down with one other person at this web page and finding answers to questions not only answers their questions, but it also reinforces your knowledge.

For answers to any missing questions please contact us to have the Answers team consider making additions. Similarly, if you have a concern about any answer, please contact us.

 

ZOOM FEATURE
… which you may find to be important
for your viewing pleasure and for sharing information with others

 

— To zoom-in and zoom-out at this web page (and this website):
     do a left-mouse-click multiple times at the large “A”
     or small “A” at the upper right of the web page.
Go to the very top of this web page to see the large and small A’s.



Do you have a question or comment that needs an answer? Do you have any feedback?

Please contact us if you have a question or topic about single-payer, Medicare for All, for which you would like to have an answer. Our Answers Team would be very happy to consider your input.
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